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Posted On: 6th Aug 2013

Fitness for Females

Fixers during the photoshoot
Britannie (left) with fellow Fixers and YPC during photoshoot

A sporty Fixer from Birmingham, who feels there is a negative stigma attached to females in sport, has created a poster campaign to kick out sexism.

 

Britannie Crossfield (19) is concerned too many young women shy away from physical activity, which she believes is partly because young women do not see sport as being ‘feminine.’

 

With the help of Fixers, Britannie has made a series of posters featuring women of all shapes, sizes, and backgrounds competing in a variety of sports.

 

Using a theme of evolution, the posters show women at different stages of the day, bearing the tagline: "Keeping fit is an essential part of my life."

 

‘I hope my campaign encourages younger females to get more active after leaving school,’ says Britannie, who also features in the posters.

 

‘I hope this negative perception surrounding younger females who partake in sporting activities will change and, in turn, it will inspire them to lead active lives.’

 

The campaign is aimed at 16-19 year olds, the age group Britannie feels is more likely to abandon physical exercise after leaving school.

 

A study from the Women’s Sport and Fitness Foundation asked 1,500 pupils for their views on fitness.

 

More than half of the girls said they were put off by their experiences of PE lessons in school.

 

‘I feel that many people abandon exercise upon leaving school because they no longer feel the need to keep fit,' Britannie says.

 

‘There are the obvious health benefits of playing sports along with increased self-confidence, and my aim with these posters is to get more people seeing these benefits.'

 

You can view the posters below.

 

 

  

 

 

 

Author: N. Farooq

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