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Posted On: 16th Feb 2016

Post it Nots

Fixer Kimmy Hasson
An image from the Fixers poster
An image from the Fixers poster

A student who was called a ‘freak’ when she died her hair blue is calling on people to see beyond stereotypes.

 

Kimmy Hasson, from Londonderry, Northern Ireland,  says: ’When I was 13, I dyed my hair blue. You wouldn’t believe how many adults made it their business to call me a freak.

 

‘Blue hair may have been against school rules, but nobody had the right to call me disgusting, stupid or ugly and embarrass me in front of my friends.

 

‘It would have been kinder to say, “You’ve broken school rules. Go home and change your hair to a natural colour.”’

 

The 23-year-old is campaigning through Fixers to get the message across that people are more than the labels others put on them.

 

Kimmy, who studies at North West Regional College says: ‘Too often, we take one look at a person and decide if they’re ‘one of us’. If they don’t belong, they are often considered bad.

 

 

‘This creates them-and-us situations.

 

‘We have too much of that in Northern Ireland, so I wanted to challenge the status quo.’

 

With Fixers, Kimmy has created a poster in which a young man’s face is covered in labels showing popular stereotypes - loner, goth, hipster, spide, punk and nerd.

 

A caption on the poster reads: ‘Behind every label is a human being. See the person not the stereotype.’

 

 

Kimmy says: ‘Image is one of the ways we express ourselves but underneath, we are all people.’

 

‘We are more than the sports top we wear, more than our piercings or tattoos and more than the colour of our hair.’

 

To find other resources on this topic, and watch more Fixers films, click on the image below.

 

Author: Cara Laithwaite

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Fixers is a project of the Public Service Broadcasting Trust, funded by the National Lottery through the Big Lottery Fund, and featured on ITV.

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